Grit and Grace


Last night we saw the Glen Campbell Farewell Tour at the beautiful Merrill Auditorium in Portland, Maine.   The show was opened by two of his children who are part of a trio calling themselves Victoria Ghost.  The three of them, along with another son (the drummer) are also part of his band.  Amazing talented offspring.   If you were not aware that Glen was suffering from Alzheimer’s you might think he had had a little too much to drink. It made me sad thinking about how many times he may have humiliated himself and his family before the diagnosis, how many fans may have turned away, at least temporarily. With the help of teleprompters he remembered most of his lyrics. When he got stuck the audience would sing along or he would turn to one of his children.  He mentioned he was in Portland, Maine at the beginning but then kept giving shout outs to Portland, Oregon.  To be fair, I’ve seen other performers make mistakes like that, simple slips of the tongue that can be expected when you wake up in a different city every day.   I have to admit, before I saw him,  my cynical side was wondering exactly who this tour was for. If he was so far gone into his disease, how could it be for him? Would he even remember?  Were his handlers just trying to make a few more bucks off this legend while they could?  Seeing how his family cared for him on stage and how genuinely happy he was to be there dispelled all of that.  His kids and the rest of the band handled his gaffes with humor and grace. They gently brought him back to the moment.  He joked around about his memory, he teased his daughter and was wife who was off stage.  He just beamed with pride at all of them.   He sang all of the favorites; Galveston, Rhinestone Cowboy, By the Time I Get to Phoenix, Wichita Lineman, Gentle on my Mind and some I hadn’t heard in years like Where’s the Playground, Suzie?.   Two that were really powerful were True Grit (he claims he made John Wayne look so good he won him the Oscar!) and It’s Your Amazing Grace.

True Grit

One day, little girl, the sadness will leave your face
As soon as you’ve won the fight to get justice done
Someday little girl you’ll wonder what life’s about
But other’s have known few battles are won alone
So, you’ll look around to find
Someone who’s kind, someone who is fearless like you
The pain of it will ease a bit When you find a man with true grit

One day you will rise and you won’t believe your eyes
You’ll wake up and see, A world that is fine and free
Though summer seems far away
You will find the sun one day

It’s Your Amazing Grace

Everything I have in this world
I give it to you
Everything I see in this world
I see it through you, oh yes I do

You’re all that’s in my heart
You’re all that’s in my head

You know I believe this
That your amazing grace
It’s your amazing grace
Yes it is

I hold my head in my hands and I cry
When I think of you
Amazing grace
Keeps us together

You’re all that’s in my heart
You’re all that’s in my head

You know I believe this
That your amazing grace
It’s your amazing grace
Yes it is

I hold my head in my hands and I cry
When I think of you
Amazing grace
Keeps us together

When I started this blog, the first thing I did was seek out blogs of other women going through breast cancer. There were many. And then I found blogs of caregivers, men with cancer, mothers blogging about their children with cancer, women with cancers that are largely ignored while they are constantly  bombarded with breast cancer awareness.  I cannot start my day until I check in and read what is happening in their lives, how they are doing with treatment or how life is beyond treatment.  They run the gamut from heart wrenching, funny, inspirational,  uplifting, sarcastic and cynical.  One thing they all have in common is true grit and grace and I’m so happy I’ve found them.

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